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Children with rheumatoid arthritis may experience relief by going gluten-free: study

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(NaturalNews) A silent epidemic known as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), which is now believed to afflict nearly 300,000 children under the age of 18, could be the result of undiagnosed gluten sensitivity or even celiac disease (CD) in some children, suggests a little-known study published in the Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology (SJG). Researchers from King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Saudi Arabia discovered that children with JRA who also show signs of CD may experience dramatic improvements after starting a gluten-free diet.

These same children may also experience dramatic symptom reductions after cutting wheat and wheat-based foods out of their diets, an outcome observed in at least one child who showed clear markers of CD during the study. According to the research, this child, who had anti-endomysium antibodies (AEA) in conjunction with a CD diagnosis, showed improvements in both growth parameter and articular symptoms upon adoption of a gluten-free diet.

This reduction in articular symptoms, a designation that collectively marks the types of joint pain experienced by sufferers of JRA, suggests that gluten itself could be the actual cause of these symptoms, and that cutting it out could help all children with JRA experience relief. Though the Saudi study focuses specifically on JRA sufferers who also show signs of CD, the fact that eliminating gluten addressed JRA symptoms directly points to much wider therapeutic potential.

Researchers from the Karolinska Institutet at Huddinge University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, procured even stronger evidence of this in a study which they conducted two years prior. Published in the peer-reviewed journal Rheumatology, their groundbreaking research revealed that the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis in general respond well to a diet free of gluten.

“The data provide evidence that dietary modification may be of clinical benefit for certain RA patients, and that this benefit may be related to a reduction in immunoreactivity to food antigens eliminated by the change in diet,” the researchers wrote.

Modern wheat varieties structurally different than ‘heritage’ wheat, which did not cause disease

While neither study pinpoints which came first, the RA or the CD, or whether one causes the other, both studies suggest that wheat and gluten consumption is probably not the best dietary choice for sufferers of RA and JRA. This is especially true due to the fact that modern, hybridized wheat varieties contain altered proteins and unique antigens, which some say is a major driver behind the sharp rise in gluten intolerance and celiac disease in the industrialized world.

“The astounding list of problems we have with modern wheat is not due to an increase in gluten content,” claims Dr. William Davis, author of The New York Times (NYT) bestseller Wheat Belly. “It is due to other changes, including:” “[a]ltered structure of the gliadin proteins,” “[c]hange in the structure of wheat germ agglutinin” and “[u]nique antigens (allergy- and immune-stimulating proteins).”

Studies linking the origins of both RA and JRA to chronic gut problems further suggest that, at best, consumption of modern wheat and wheat derivatives exacerbates a health condition that science shows is already a product of gut inflammation. At worst, these chronic joint diseases are the product of an ever-evolving food supply that is increasingly modified, contaminated and generally harmful to human health.

“Gluten is only one of the reasons to fear wheat, since it triggers a host of immune diseases like celiac, rheumatoid arthritis, and gluten encephalopathy (dementia from wheat),” adds Dr. Davis. “Beyond gluten, there are over 1000 other proteins in wheat that also have potential for odd or unexpected responses. You might say that wheat is a perfectly crafted Frankengrain that almost appears like it was created to exert maximum health damage in the most desirable, irresistible form possible.”

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/044216_rheumatoid_arthritis_gluten_celiac_disease.html#ixzz2vOyD22Ps

Prehistoric skull tells researchers that man needed meat in order to thrive

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“I know this will sound awful to vegetarians, but meat made us human,” said researcher and archaeologist Manuel Dominguez-Rodrigo about the findings. “Human brain development could not have existed without a diet based on regular consumption of meat.”

(NaturalNews) A prehistoric human skull recently unearthed from a gorge in eastern Africa provides new evidence that meat has actually been a vital part of the human diet for far longer than some scientists believe. According to research out of The Complutense University in Madrid, Spain, the skull fragment exhibits clear signs of B-vitamin deficiency, which researchers believe points to the fact that humans have always needed meat in their diets to avoid vitamin deficiencies and facilitate proper development.

Published in the open-access journal PLoS One, the findings contradict an erroneous belief held by some that early man was primarily vegetarian, and that meat was a rare or nonexistent component of the prehistoric diet. Based on the types of bone lesions observed in the skull, which appears to have come from a child of about two years of age, the research team determined that the individual to whom it was once attached had anemia due to an inadequate amount of meat in the diet.

Because the skull appears to have come from a child who was just leaving the weaning period of his life, the team says the lesions appear indicative of meat deficiency, as the child had not yet transitioned from breast milk to solid foods that included meat. The child’s mother was apparently also meat-deficient, since she clearly did not pass on the necessary vitamins for healthy development to her child.

“I know this will sound awful to vegetarians, but meat made us human,” said researcher and archaeologist Manuel Dominguez-Rodrigo about the findings. “Human brain development could not have existed without a diet based on regular consumption of meat.”

The meat consumed by early humans was far different than the type consumed in mainstream society today, however. Rather than be raised in confinement and fed unnatural, genetically-modified (GM) corn and soy, animals eaten for food in prehistoric days lived in the wild where they hunted other small animals or grazed on grasslands. This major difference accounts for the compositional differences between wild meat and confined meat, the latter of which is linked to causing chronic health problems.

Grass-fed, pastured meat and meat products are the closest equivalent to the type of meat that prehistoric man ate, and it is the best option for you and your family today. Unlike feedlot-based meat and meat products, which contain virtually no omega-3 fatty acids, grass-fed meat and meat products are nutritionally superior and contain balanced ratios of the nutrients the body needs for vibrant health. (http://www.eatwild.com/healthbenefits.htm)

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037526_prehistoric_skulls_meat_consumption_human_diet.html#ixzz29NdAZNGB

Primal/Paleo BRAISED GOAT SHANK

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Primal Chicken Cordon Bleu

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Primal/Paleo Chicken Cordon Bleu

Primal Blueprint Recipe: Braised Beef Shank with Parsnip Puree.

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Instructions for making primal beef shank with parsnip purée and green vegetable.

Veggie Loaded Meatloaf

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This is a wonderful Meatloaf full of Veggies! Its caveman style!

Turkey
Bacon
Eggs
Bell Peppers (Green, Yellow, or Red)
Kale
Baby Spinach
Onion
*Seasonings!

*I use salt, pepper, and red chili pepper flakes.
*Other seasonings come from the tomato sauce (onion powder & garlic powder.)

Occasionally I’ll use Italian herbs tomato sauce. Make sure whatever you choose that it doesn’t have sugar. Read ingredients.

Remember to bake before eating! 350° at 1 hour 5 minutes (if you’re using my oven.)

Five best healthy foods for lowering your stress levels fast

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Five best healthy foods for lowering your stress levels fast

Wednesday, September 26, 2012 by: J. D. Heyes
Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037321_healthy_foods_lowering_stress_almonds.html#ixzz27aJHoBEq

(NaturalNews) Most of us would agree that life is a busy endeavor, which can lead to lots of stress. And the busier we get, the more stress we have to deal with.

Fortunately, there is a medicine-free way in which you can reduce a significant portion of that stress, all from the comfort of your own kitchen and dining room. Here are six excellent, healthy foods that can help you lower your stress levels naturally:

Grab a couple handfuls of almonds daily. Almonds, and other nuts, are so good for so many different reasons – among them; their ability to reduce your stress level.

“Nuts are loaded with vitamin E, which boosts immunity,” says Health and Living. “A healthy immune system means you’re less likely to fall victim to that cold that’s making its way around the office, and a healthier you means a less stressed you, too.”

According to Anna Magee and nutritional therapist Charlotte Watts, authors of the book The De-Stress Diet, “Nuts are crammed with B vitamins, zinc, magnesium, and omega oils, nutrients that are depleted when anxiety is high. As a source of healthy fats, nuts have also been shown to curb appetite, naturally balance blood sugar levels, reduce sugar cravings, and support the metabolism.”

Use caution; however, in terms of the amount of almonds and other nuts you consume, writes Lisa Collier Cool for Yahoo! Health.

There’s no fish like oily fish. Fish like salmon, which is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, is the perfect dinner de-stress option. “Omega-3s have been shown to boost mood and brain function, and can aid significantly in dealing with anxiety and depression,” Health and Living says.

“A 2011 study from Ohio State showed a 20 percent reduction in anxiety among medical school students who took omega-3 supplements,” Cool notes. “The researchers made this surprising discovery during research to test their theory that omega-3s would lower stress-induced levels of cytokines, compounds that promote inflammation in the body, which can lead to illness and heart attack.”

Oily fish also contain a host of vitamins and minerals – B vitamins, zinc, and magnesium – “that help reduce sugar-addiction cycles and counteract the damaging effects of stress on the body,” says Dina Spector of BusinessInsider.com.

Oh, yes – chocolate. Not that the other foods aren’t good (and good for you), but seriously, who can resist a little chocolate?

Few of us can but that’s all right because a little chocolate goes a long way towards reducing our stress levels.

“Too much indulgence is likely to keep you from your weight-loss goals, but a small portion of chocolate as a pick-me-up isn’t such a bad idea,” Health and Living says. “This sweet treat helps to boost serotonin levels, which plays a key role in dealing with stress. In a study conducted by Duke Medical Center, researchers found that lower levels of serotonin actually cause a more extreme reaction when the body encounters stress.”

How much is just enough?

“Research has shown that 40g of dark chocolate a day can help us cope with stress by releasing ‘happy chemicals’ known as beta endorphins in the brain,” says Spector. “When it comes to a treat, dark chocolate can be a good snack choice to stave off cravings for less healthy choices, while providing a much-needed energy boost without the agitating effects of caffeine.”

From chocolate to… spinach. Well, Popeye knew a little something about nutrition after all.

“Spinach and other dark leafy greens like Swiss chard and kale are loaded with magnesium, which has been credited as a major stress fighter, helping to relax muscle fibers and put you at ease,” says Health and Living.

“There’s no such thing as a chill pill, but some foods contain body-boosting nutrients that help soothe stressed-out nerves,” adds Whole Living, noting that green leafy foods contain folic acid, which helps “make dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with pleasure.”

Oranges – for sunshine in your life. Oranges, along with Brussels sprouts, broccoli, red and green peppers and strawberries contain lots of vitamin C, which “boosts your immune system and fights brain-cell damage resulting from constant exposure to cortisol,” says Whole Living.

“Stress makes our body release even more free radicals than when we are in good mood. Interestingly, vitamin C helps to keep the free radicals in control, and repairs the body. Basically, it helps protect the body from the cumulative effects of stress,” adds Dr. Lee Dobbins, a physician who specializes in weight loss-related issues.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037321_healthy_foods_lowering_stress_almonds.html#ixzz27aJ87pQE

Eat berries to prevent age-related memory loss

berries

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Eat berries to prevent age-related memory loss

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 by: Amelia Bentrup

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037240_berries_memory_loss_neurobiology.html#ixzz26vPozGpb

(NaturalNews) Recent research published in Annals of Neurology and lead by Elizabeth Devore and her team of researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston showed that women who eat more berries have a slower rate of age-related memory loss than those who do not. The study began in 1980 and followed Nurses’ Health Study Participants via questionnaire administered every four years. Between 1995-2001, the researches measured the cognitive function of over 16,000 women over 70 years of age. Cognitive function was measured via three phone interviews at two year intervals. The phone interviews consisted of asking participants to remember details from a paragraph read to them or from a list of words or numbers. It was found that women who consumed more berries experienced a slower decline in mental function that averaged out to about 2 1/2 years. Furthermore, it was found that a higher intake of total anthocyanidins and flavonoids was associated with a decreased rate of cognitive decline.

The women in this study did not eat large quantities of berries each day. In fact, memory improvement was noted with only 1/2 cup of blueberry consumption or 1 cup total strawberry consumption per week. It was also noted that women who ate more berries, tended to exercise more and be of a higher income. However, even after adjusting for those confounding factors, it was still found that greater berry consumption was significantly associated with improved memory and brain function.

Previous studies have shown similar results. A study published May 2005 in the Annals of Neruology showed that increased consumption of green leafy vegetables was associated with a significantly slower loss of memory and cognitive function. Fruit and vegetables are thought to help prevent age-related memory loss and cognitive decline due to their polyphenol component. Studies conducted on rodents have shown that certain plant polyphenols from grapes, strawberries, blueberries, and plums can improve brain function. In fact, studies have shown that blueberry extracts can protect rats bred to develop brain changes similar to Alzheimer’s Disease from memory decline. Blueberries are thought to be so effective because they contain anthocyanidins, an anti-oxidant which helps move blood into the brain. Human studies have shown that adding blueberry juice to the diet each day can improve memory.

Affording quality produce

Blueberries, strawberries and other fruits and vegetables aren’t just important for preventing memory decline. There are a whole host of studies showing the protective effects of eating lots of fruits and vegetables against cancer, diabetes, heart disease and other serious illness. If possible, it is best to consume organic fruits and vegetables, as berries especially tend to be very high in pesticides. Since organic berries are very expensive, the cheapest way is to either grow your own or buy from a local, organic farm. Berries and other fruits and vegetables can be easily frozen or canned for consumption when they are of season. While organic, quality produce is more expensive, the health benefits and decreased medical costs down the line are more than worth it.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037240_berries_memory_loss_neurobiology.html#ixzz26vPZFCfY

Top five reasons why you should remove grains from your diet for good

grains

Top five reasons why you should remove grains from your diet for good

Wednesday, September 05, 2012 by: Eric Hunter

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037073_gluten_food_pyramid_grains.html#ixzz25bMZR6Mx

(NaturalNews) Government guidelines and advice from medical doctors can often lead people to believe that cereal grains are the foundation of a healthy diet. The food pyramid, now renamed the food plate, dictates that people should eat several servings of whole grains each day to provide an adequate supply of vitamins, minerals and fiber. This advice is given despite the fact that humans are poorly adapted to the consumption of cereal grains and that the scientific literature shows that grain consumption is linked to several health problems.

Grains have only been a part of the human diet for about 10,000 years, which is a very small time in the context of evolution. Just because humans can tolerate grains to a certain degree doesn’t mean that we are designed to consume grains or that we can achieve optimal health on a grain-based diet.

1) High-carbohydrate density and increased insulin load

Carbohydrates are eventually converted into a simple form of sugar, glucose, after they are consumed. Insulin is secreted and allows glucose to be transported into various cells throughout the body. Individuals who aren’t very physically active don’t have the need to continually refill their muscle and liver cells with glycogen, and these cells often start to become insulin-resistant on a grain-based diet.

Regular consumption of high-density carbohydrates is not only linked to insulin resistance and overweight, but also leptin resistance, altered gut flora and inflammation.

2) Antinutrients

Grains are the reproductive material of the plant, and plants don’t make the reproductive material to give away for free to animals. Cereal grains have evolved Lectins, Phytic Acid, Protease Inhibitors and other anti-nutrients that potentially disrupt normal gut physiology when they are consumed over time. Only certain anti-nutrients are problematic in humans, and they seem to operate in a dose-dependent manner.

Regular consumption of anti-nutrients in grains may lead to poor mineral absorption, autoimmune disease, leaky gut and low-level chronic inflammation. More studies on human subjects are needed to fully understand the detrimental effects of Lectins and other anti-nutrients on human health.

3) Gluten

Studies and anecdotal reports indicate that gluten intolerance is much more common than previously thought, and many asymptomatic individuals react to gluten with some type of inflammatory response.

4) Insoluble fiber

While fruits and vegetables contain heart-healthy, soluble fiber that promote good gut flora, cereal grains are high in insoluble fiber that shouldn’t be eaten in excess. More insoluble fiber is often recommended for healthy digestion, despite the fact that healthy gut bacteria is the key to relieve constipation and achieve healthy bowel movements.

5) Dietary imbalances

Cereal grains have several dietary shortcomings, and a grain-based diet can disrupt adequate nutritional balance. Cereal grains are poor sources of fiber, minerals, vitamins and protein compared to animal products, fruits and vegetables. They contain no vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin B12, calcium nor sodium, and several animal studies show that grain consumption can induce vitamin D deficiencies and alter the metabolism of several minerals.

Cereal grains only supply some of the essential amino acids, very few essential fatty acids and are also characterized by a high omega-6 to omega-3 ratio.

Traditional grain preparation

Some traditional cultures have been known to consume grains on a regular basis and still maintain excellent health. However, these populations have usually used soaking, sprouting and fermentation to make the grains easier to digest. These preparation methods remove or deactivate some of the anti-nutrients commonly found in grains, and fermentation is especially effective when trying to make grains more digestible.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037073_gluten_food_pyramid_grains.html#ixzz25bMO5b2s

Is Saturated Fat Bad?

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fat

Is saturated fat really a deadly nutrient?

Tuesday, September 04, 2012 by: Ben Hirshberg

(NaturalNews) Many doctors and health experts vilify dietary fat, urging everyone to cut down on the macronutrient in favor of low fat alternatives. Even more common is for health experts to talk about good fats and bad fats. More often than not, saturated fat is at the top of the fat naughty list. It is worth examining how saturated fat got its reputation for being a deadly nutrient and seeing if the reputation is deserved or not.

Saturated fat and Ancel Keys

Those who abhor saturated fat point to the work of Dr. Ancel Keys, who popularized the notion that saturated fat causes heart disease. In 1953, Keys wrote a paper with the key finding of a correlation between fat intake and heart disease deaths in six countries around the world. Data was actually available for 22 countries around the world, and the association between fat intake and heart disease was not present in several of the countries.

17 years later, Keys published a study looking at seven countries that found a correlation between animal fats and heart disease rates, as well as total cholesterol numbers and heart disease rates. Keys concluded that saturated fats in animal foods led to high cholesterol levels which led to higher incidences of heart disease. The problem with Keys’ 1970 study of the seven countries was that three of the seven countries examined actually had no correlation between animal fat consumption and heart disease prevalence.

Saturated fat and cholesterol

As far as the connection between saturated fat and cholesterol goes, Keys got it wrong as well. Saturated fat does increase LDL cholesterol, which builds up plaque on artery walls. Saturated fat also increases HDL cholesterol, as much or possibly more than it increases LDL cholesterol. HDL cholesterol removes plaque from artery walls, which means that any damage saturated fat does to bad cholesterol is undone by its effect on good cholesterol levels.

Furthermore, it appears saturated fat doesn’t affect LDL cholesterol levels as negatively as previously thought. LDL cholesterol comes in two varieties: small and dense particles or large and fluffy particles. The large and fluffy LDL particles have no association with clogged arteries, whereas the small and dense LDL particles had a strong association with clogged arteries. It turns out that replacing carbohydrates with saturated or unsaturated fats decreases the levels of small, dense LDL particles.

Saturated fat – A vital nutrient?

So is saturated fat the demonic nutrient conventional wisdom makes it out to be? It appears that the answer is no, and that saturated fat is not only safe but actually quite beneficial to human physiology. Saturated fat improves cardiovascular risk factors, increases bone strength, improves liver health, is essential to lung and brain health, influences insulin release and metabolic rate, and helps the immune system function. Ancel Keys got it wrong, and unfortunately his condemnation of saturated fat has contributed to a widespread dietary fat phobia.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.menshealth.com/health/saturated-fat
http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog/2009/06/06/saturated-fat/
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/saturated-fat-healthy/#axzz24uV2KtXB

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037055_saturated_fat_cholesterol_health_myths.html#ixzz25WYJLxNX

Low-carbohydrate diets make you lean and healthy, systematic review shows

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diets

Low-carbohydrate diets make you lean and healthy, systematic review shows

Thursday, August 30, 2012 by: Eric Hunter

(NaturalNews) The amount of research on low-carbohydrate diets have skyrocketed the last couple of years; mostly due to the increased popularity of carbohydrate restriction and the “overwhelming” amounts of anecdotal reports from people following these types of diets. Individuals who adhere to a low-carbohydrate eating style usually get most of their calories from fat, and skeptics often argue that the increased consumption of meat and saturated fat will “clog the arteries” and increase the risk of disease. A new meta-analysis, a systematic review of studies, found that low-carbohydrate diets lead to weight loss and improved health.

A low-carbohydrate diet usually involves reduced consumption of grains, legumes, rice, certain dairy products and sometimes fruits and root vegetables. Fat becomes the main source of energy, and avocado, coconut products, oils, full-fat dairy, meat, fish, fowl, eggs, olives etc., are common food staples.

The exact amount of carbohydrates in different types of “low-carbohydrate” diets usually range from 0-100 grams.

The systematic review of low-carbohydrate diets used 23 reports that met the criteria of the analysis; which includes 17 clinical investigations and a total of 1,141 obese patients. Low carbohydrate diets were found to be associated with significant decreases in body weight, blood pressure, insulin levels and plasma C-reactive protein. In general, low-carbohydrate diets were found to improve all cardiovascular risk factors. Weight loss in itself also contributes to improved metabolic markers.

Low-carbohydrate diets will not clog your arteries

The link between saturated fat, cholesterol and heart disease has long been considered an established connection by many medical professionals. However, when looking into the human physiology and biomedical literature, one quickly realizes that it’s not so cut and dry. Several comprehensive reviews conclude that low-carbohydrate diets don’t increase the risk of heart disease and cardiovascular disease.

The new systematic review also showed that low-carbohydrate diets cause an increase in HDL, the “good” cholesterol, and no significant changes in LDL, the “bad” cholesterol. It’s also known that the majority of people can eat cholesterol without it affecting their cholesterol levels. Rather than elevated blood cholesterol, inflammation seems to be the major cause of heart disease.

This doesn’t mean that a low-carbohydrate diet is necessarily the optimal diet

The benefits of these systematic reviews are that they look at several reports, rather than just presenting the data from one study. This way it’s possible to get a larger picture and be able to draw more accurate conclusions. However, this meta-analysis gives little information about the effects of low carbohydrate diets compared to other popular diets, the exact amount of carbohydrate necessary to achieve good results and which foods to choose.

Sticking to a low-carbohydrate diet usually means increased consumption of paleolithic foods and reduced consumption of processed foods, grains, legumes, milk and other western foods staples.
These “modern” foods often have a high-carbohydrate density and contain several anti-nutrients, problematic proteins and hormones. Thereby, avoiding these foods results in reduced inflammation and a healthier life.

Epidemiological studies show that humans can maintain excellent health when eating a high-carbohydrate diet based on fruits, berries, nuts and root tubers and other vegetables.

The one group of people that “always” benefits from carbohydrate restriction is overweight and obese individuals. All of the available literature shows that low carbohydrate diets are linked to significantly more weight loss compared to other diets. Overweight and obesity usually go hand in hand with low-level chronic inflammation, insulin resistance and leptin resistance. Carbohydrate restriction usually improves insulin and leptin resistance among other things, thereby contributing to weight loss.

Sources for this article include

Santos FL, Esteves SS, da Costa Pereira A, et al. Systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials of the effects of low carbohydrate diets on cardiovascular risk factors.
Obes Rev. 2012 Aug 21. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2012.01021.x. [Epub ahead of print]

Mente A, et al. A systematic review of the evidence supporting a causal link between dietary factors and coronary heart disease.Arch Intern Med. 2009 Apr 13;169(7):659-69.

Hooper L, et al. Reduced or modified dietary fat for preventing cardiovascular disease.Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011 Jul 6;(7):CD002137.

Siri-Tarino PW, et al. Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the associationof saturated fat with cardiovascular disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar;91(3):535-46.

Kratz M, et al. The relationship between high-fat dairy consumption and obesity, cardiovascular, and metabolic disease. European Journal of Nutrition, Online First?, 18 July 2012

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037001_low-carb_diet_body_fat_healthy.html#ixzz255IL4U6G

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037001_low-carb_diet_body_fat_healthy.html#ixzz255I8083o

Excess belly fat – How it happens and how to get rid of it for good

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fat

Excess belly fat – How it happens and how to get rid of it for good

Thursday, August 30, 2012 by: PF Louis

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037006_belly_fat_solutions_chronic_stress.html#ixzz253EQ3ivL

(NaturalNews) General obesity is an epidemic. But it’s possible to experience belly fat without being generally obese with fat enlarged torso, arms, and legs that demand waddling while walking. Your arms, upper torso, face, and legs can appear normal with an extended belly and expanded waistline.

Beer bellies are often wheat bellies. This can result from eating wheat products, even whole grain, with its high glycemic index (GI). Today’s wheat has been transformed into a nutritionally weakened hybrid that contains 10 times more gluten than the wheat of a half-century ago.

Even for those who don’t have extreme wheat/gluten sensitivity or Celiac disease, one can surpass his or her capacity for digesting gluten, leading to that wheat belly.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037006_belly_fat_solutions_chronic_stress.html#ixzz253EKYxb5

(http://www.naturalnews.com/036845_wheat_belly_weight_gain_gluten.html)

Wait, there’s more!

So you’ve cut back on wheat and even avoided gluten-free products that contain potato starch and tapioca, both high GI substances. But the waistline remains the same.

Stress affects your hormones. Cortisol comes from the same gland that provides adrenaline for short-term reactions to perceived dangers. But cortisol is produced from chronic stress without any real outlet. It can build up, cause hormonal imbalances and create a suddenly bulging belly.

For women who experience an estrogen imbalance, too high or low, the belly can bulge also. For men, it’s testosterone deficiencies that can bring on the beer belly. Stress can also influence the sex hormones. So a simple solution, in addition to excluding gluten to some extent, would be reducing stress.

Diet still remains important. Organic foods with lots of greens while abstaining from processed and junk foods goes a long way to both reducing the waistline and stress. Intense exercise may be fun for some, but how many who practice hatha yoga have beer/wheat bellies, hmm?

Focusing on stress reduction

Sometimes stress is handled by eating “comfort foods” that are high in simple, processed carbs and sugars and bad fats, creating a vicious big belly cycle. So there need to be other options for reducing the stress that directs fat to the belly and promotes indulging in comfort foods.

An important method for eliminating stress is getting enough high quality sleep. Even if you’re in bed for eight hours nightly, you may not be getting even close that much quality sleep. The key word is quality. (http://www.naturalnews.com/026637_sleep_health_immune_system.html)

Difficulty falling asleep, getting up often, waking up easily and often from restlessness all make the process of an immune enhancing quality sleep impossible. Save your coffee for the morning hours. Maybe some chamomile tea late in the evening would help.

Relax before hitting the sack with a pleasurable activity. Better yet, meditate or practice the corpse pose of yoga where you relax every part of your body until you achieve a totally tranquil state of relaxation. (http://suite101.com)

Make sure your bedroom is completely dark. No lights of any kind anywhere, and a little on the cool side, around 70 degrees Fahrenheit. This is an ideal sleep environment.

Melatonin supplements, especially sub-lingual, can help you fall asleep. Start at three mg and experiment for the right dose, anywhere from one to ten mg. Too much leaves you rested but groggy upon awakening.

Cut out unnecessary stress. In this modern culture of political correctness and self-defeating politeness, we sometimes take on tasks that are not necessary for our survival or our best interests. Too many demanded tasks and frivolous meetings create unnecessary stress.

In other words, allow yourself to enjoy being you. Walks in nature, an occasional picnic, time spent listening to good music are a few examples of ways to eliminate stress without resorting to excess alcohol or comfort food binging.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037006_belly_fat_solutions_chronic_stress.html#ixzz253EArbHx

The Truth About Cholesterol Part 1

The Straight Dope on Cholesterol: 10 Things You Need to Know – Part 1

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‘Wheat-belly’ 101

wheat

‘Wheat-belly’ 101 – Five clues that your excess weight is caused by gluten

Friday, August 17, 2012 by: PF Louis

If you want to get rid of a Beer Belly, check out my Kindle Book David’s Diet.  It’s only .99 cents and can be read in just a couple hours.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/036845_wheat_belly_weight_gain_gluten.html#ixzz23oggyZd9

(NaturalNews) Wheat today is not what it used to be. It is more of a hybrid version of 19th century and earlier versions of wheat our ancestors relied on for their daily bread. The same is true for a few other grains.

Today’s wheat is a genetic modification of horticultural or agricultural specie combining. This genetic modification is different than laboratory GMO gene splicing. Nevertheless, the amount of 20th century agricultural genetic modification has outpaced the human digestive system’s ability to adapt.

The result is that even if you are not a celiac disease sufferer or gluten sensitive, you still could be suffering from the ill effects of wheat and other grains. Even organic whole wheat has a high glycemic index (GI), which over time may increase your glycemic load and create diabetes II.

So although whole wheat grains are considered complex carbohydrates, modern day wheat contains amylopectin A, which is a rapidly absorbed carbohydrate that spikes your blood sugar, but more. The other grains that can contribute to wheat belly include: Barley, rye, triticale (a cross between wheat and rye), bulgur, farina, kamut, seminola, durum flour, and spelt. Bummer, eh?

There are safer grain options, however. Buckwheat, which is not actually wheat, amaranth, rice, hominy, sorghum, tapioca, arrowroot, quinoa, and einkorn are okay. Uncommon einkorn is the ancient traditional wheat our ancestors enjoyed. Oats are controversial. Some argue that oats are contaminated by wheat.

The downside of wheat and some other grains

Beer belly is actually wheat or grain belly, according to Body Ecology. It is visceral fat, or fat that has accumulated around body cavity organs, such as the liver, stomach, or intestines. Subcutaneous fat is just under the skin. It is the flabby, flesh of any part of your body.

Obese folks have both visceral and subcutaneous fat issues. A beer or wheat belly most likely indicates visceral fat. In addition to the obvious potential of diabetes II from obesity, there is another ominous aspect of visceral fat.

Visceral fat acts as a gland, secreting hormones that make the immune system react. This produces more fat to store and protect pathogens from invading our organs. It’s the proverbial vicious cycle, and it also produces low level chronic inflammation that can result in various autoimmune diseases.

Cardiologist William Davis, MD, warns against the gluten free diet for losing a wheat belly. The wheat substitutes such as potato flour have high glycemic index issues also, and they can increase your GI load to cause the obesity you’re trying to avoid.

Five wheat belly indicators in addition to a bloated belly

1) High blood sugar
2) Skin problems, rashes, acne, and eczema
3) Bouts of anxiety and depression – low energy
4) Gut disorders – yeast infections
5) Early aging disorders that include dementia

Beyond this lies celiac disease, which can be determined by a blood test and/or gut biopsy.

Sprouted grain bread options

Weston A. Price Foundation founders Sally Fallon and Mary G. Enig, PhD, researched sprouted grains and determined they had a lower GI than grains not sprouted.

The sprouts still contain some gluten, but sprouted grain enzymes break down a good deal of the grains’ normally harmful ingredients. They are more nutritious than merely whole grains.

There are the Ezekiel sprouted grain breads. Some bakeries make sprouted wheat and other sprouted grain breads. Whole Food bakeries provide a sourdough, sprouted wheat bread without bromide, a harmful ingredient used by most bakeries.

You might be able to get away with some of the options mentioned in this article instead of being forced into a strict Paleolithic (Paleo) or hunter/gatherer diet to avoid wheat belly.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/036845_wheat_belly_weight_gain_gluten.html#ixzz23ogWGGMs